Procrastinations of a working man

 

Some interesting developments over the last couple of days, firstly I am now definitely going part time with my current job, I'm only dropping one working day but it is a start, after all canal locks produce big changes slowly.

 

Disjointedly moving on, a technical point now - which is probably pretty obvious is that I have discovered - via a mixture of curiously, research, and frustration that my technical pens will work absolutely perfectly with diluted inks.  This opens up so many new possibilities in terms of colours.  Since beginning experimenting with coloured inks and technical pens I have always used white to tint, change and lighten each colour, this is how can I say...limited and lends my work a certain look.  Thumbing through books, magazines, surfing work from other artists - new and old I marvel at the colour and effects being achieved, all the while wondering how I can keep my work evolving.  Now, with this modest inky development I would like to begin exploring colours in a much wider sense, saturation, luminosity and some pure colours.  I have begun to find the use of tinting restrictive and it made me question the limits of technical pens.  As you may know I am colour blind so the use of colour can be sketchy ground for me but now an area my work demands.  

 

It's a nice thought that when I started to use colour it was a revelation, it literally transformed my work and passion for what I do in an instant, at the time I thought I'd taken such a bold step (as I'd always resigned myself to a world of monochrome work) and in a sense it still is the case, I embraced my deficiencies in colour with the simple thought in mind that that it is part of me as much as my ideas or current aesthetic so be courageous and use it - after all it's my identity and nobody else has it.  Essentially this thought distils what an artist is, what an artist has and how an artist works.  An expression of identity through a chosen vehicle (but not limited to).

 

I'm never going to be a gentle colourist or understand/ see colour in the same way that a normally sighted person does - however, this doesn't mean I cannot make an interesting submission into the very human endeavour of art.  It also (for any artists who are lacking in confidence due to colour blindness) doesn't mean that your use of colour defaults to bad or inferior - just different.

 

Thank you as always for reading.

 

Updates coming at:

 

www.stuartbelton.com

 

Firstly I will apologise for the disjointed nature of what you are about to read, I managed to stay in my studio until 11pm tonight so must be quick.

I stole a really cheeky look around the National Gallery after dinner the other day in the big smoke, I had to be quick so I decided dive into see the post impressionists and then into the incredible Australian impressionists exhibition (I was bought membership here for Christmas so this allowed me to duck in - guilt free at the minimal time I had...walking briskly past the canelettos - I had no time for caneletto's today, I had to get to the Australians before anything else.

That morning I had read an article on a Facebook page regarding the optimal viewing times that "experts" consider to be the best in which to understand the painting you are looking at.  I thought I'd put this to the test as I was I was in the perfect place to test such theories.  The time was something like four minutes and seven seconds by the way.

As I headed straight for the post impressionists (as always) but became waylaid by the superb Australian impressionists exhibition, the painting I looked at was Arthur Streeton's "fires up".  A magnificent painting by anyone's standards, I stood gazing, probably for the best part of ten minutes, I looked intently and as I did the painting begun to offer more information about itself, other characters and the story unfolded.  An experience I will never forget.

Of course I had to see my artistic idol Cézanne - rude not to, so whilst testing the above theory (which works incredibly well) I noticed - whilst loosing myself in a landscape by the great man it was painted with masses of energy...a painting that I thought I knew intimately changed before my very eyes.  Fascinating and I recommend you all do the same.

I was standing the middle of one of the huge galleries and I had stopped as I was feeling full from the meal we'd just had and slightly tipsy - I pulled my phone out to look at - i then realised - what the hell are you doing - a phone usually one of the most prized items in the hands of anyone, at least so it seems judging on every train I got onto today and the throngs of people constantly passing - heads down,
slipping quick glances forward to ensure they aren't going to collide with anything or anyone.   I digress, the phone, to me, then became the poor mans choice in terms of visual and cerebral stimulation with such a multitude of sumptuous richness to look at - need I say I see the error of my ways and promptly slipped the phone back into my pocket almost not being able to believe what an ass I had just been.


Okay more from tonight's studio session:

I had an incredibly satisfying session tonight in which I learnt a lot and saw future doors open before in anticipation of the time I need to walk through them, a fabulous feeling.

Tonight's quote - so apt and I can really respond to this:
"More of me comes out when I improvise" - Edward Hopper

Whilst considering what I had drawn tonight it occurred to me that I need to begin looking at the negative space in my work now...the stark white space could be developed and cultivated for better use in future endeavours.  The drawing that I finished tonight, it is little more than a sketch but I loved every second of its creation for the value it has given me.  I learnt a lot about new processes and the behaviour of a new pen and the qualities of the inks.

Thank you for humouring my horrendously rushed entry tonight.